Watercolor Paintings by Doug McClure (1986)

Cheryl has kindly contributed photographs of two framed paintings by Doug McClure (Trampas) that she owns.  As you can see they match the style of other paintings by Doug on this site.  They are  signed and dated 1986.  Cheryl states, “On the back of one of the frames there is a copy of part of a leaflet, dated April 1986, that promoted the debut of his paintings at The Stewart Galleries in Palm Springs.”

Cheryl describes her time staying with the McClure family.

“Along with a mutual friend of the McClure family we toured California and the neighbouring states in October 1986.  It was my first visit to America and something of a contrast to my native Cheltenham in the heart of the Cotswolds in Gloucestershire.  At the start and end of our tour we were invited to stay at the home of Doug’s brother in Pacific Palisades.  I celebrated my 26th Birthday there and Doug’s sister in law baked my Birthday cake.  They were very kind to me. 

Sadly I never got to meet Doug in person. Doug McClure gave the watercolours you see above to my friend who is also an artist.  They had a lot in common and both shared Doug’s love of tennis.  Recently my artist friend allowed me to acquire both paintings from him – I am a lucky girl!

 

Man Without A Star = Duel at Shiloh = A Man Called Gannon

For those interested in The Virginian episode “Duel at Shiloh” (1:15) you may be interested to know it’s an adaptation of the 1955 Universal-International Western film Man Without A Star starring Kirk Douglas as Dempsey Rae.  William Campbell plays the tenderfoot Jeff Jimson.  Borden Chase and D.D. Beauchamp provided the screenplay based on the novel by Dee Linford.

Brian Keith subtitutes for Kirk Douglas and Gary Clarke for William Campbell in “Duel at Shiloh.”  The parallels are interesting to watch, with similar scenes and locations. including the shooting scene above.  Man Without A Star is recommended viewing.  Campbell tries a little too hard to be convincing as a “green” youth but Douglas is on top form

The story was adapted yet again in 1968 as A Man Called Gannon featuring Tony Franciosa in the Douglas/Keith role and Michael Sarrazin in the Campbell/Clarke role.  James Goldstone directed this inferior remake.